Pictures of the week: The perfect Sunrise

The sun bursts over the horizon from Pen Y Fan, South Wales, the highest point in the South of the UK, as much of the higher ground in the country is covered in snow. January 16, 2016.

After a working week of taking incredible photographs for national press and corporate clients, what do you think the SWNS pictures team get up to during their weekends?  They take more photographs of course, attempting to capture the perfect sunrise.

SWNS picture editor Jon Mills and award winning staff photographer Dave Hedges left their houses at 3.30am on Saturday morning to climb up Pen y Fan, in the Brecon National Park, South Wales, in the dark and in snow that was sometimes knee deep.

Why did they do this?  To get the prefect shot of course! The pair decided to climb Pen y Fan after the weather reports predicted clear skies for Saturday morning following fresh snowfall (something skiers would call a ‘blueburd’). As you can see the results are amazing!

Wearing head torches, the hike took them around 2 hours to reach the top.  Now that’s dedication and commitment to get the perfect sunrise shots.

Jon said “It was absolutely freezing cold, but we thoroughly enjoyed it. Seeing the sun rise over such a stunning, snow capped landscape was worth it.

Could this be the perfect sunrise?  We’ll let you decide…

The sun bursts over the horizon from Pen Y Fan, South Wales, the highest point in the South of the UK, as much of the higher ground in the country is covered in snow. January 16, 2016.
The sun bursts over the horizon from Pen Y Fan, South Wales, the highest point in the South of the UK, as much of the higher ground in the country is covered in snow. January 16, 2016.

The sun bursts over the horizon from Pen Y Fan, South Wales, the highest point in the South of the UK, as much of the higher ground in the country is covered in snow. January 16, 2016.

The newspapers used the images and reported that Britain is getting its first widespread taste of winter this weekend, with freezing temperatures and snow affecting much of northern England on Saturday. More on Sunday today in the Midlands and South.

The warm, wet, mild weather that saw flooding across much of northern Britain over the past month was replaced by a short, sharp cold snap, according to the Met Office.

On Saturday, snow was blanketing Britain’s western hills, including Dartmoor in the Southwest, the Welsh mountains, the Lake District and Scotland.

A selection of the photos can be seen on the Mail Online, and were also features in The Sunday Times and the Express:
http://www.thesundaytimes.co.uk/sto/news/uk_news/article1657324.ece
http://www.express.co.uk/pictures/galleries/4177/Coldest-winter-weather-forecast-Britain-freezing-temperatures-snow-UK-pictures/Snowy-hills-Buxton-Derbyshire-96889

The images made several print editions of the national newspapers too.

The sun bursts over the horizon from Pen Y Fan, South Wales, the highest point in the South of the UK, as much of the higher ground in the country is covered in snow. January 16, 2016.

Photo montage made from several pictures - Early risers watch as the warm glow of the rising sun lights the cold slopes of snow covered Pen y Fan, January 16 2016. At 886 metres Pen y Fan is the highest peak in south Wales, situated in the Brecon Beacons National Park.

Photo montage made from several pictures - Early risers watch as the warm glow of the rising sun lights the cold slopes of snow covered Pen y Fan, January 16 2016. At 886 metres Pen y Fan is the highest peak in south Wales, situated in the Brecon Beacons National Park.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early risers watch as the warm glow of the rising sun lights the cold slopes of snow covered Pen y Fan, January 16 2016. At 886 metres Pen y Fan is the highest peak in south Wales, situated in the Brecon Beacons National Park.

Early risers watch as the warm glow of the rising sun lights the cold slopes of snow covered Pen y Fan, January 16 2016. At 886 metres Pen y Fan is the highest peak in south Wales, situated in the Brecon Beacons National Park.

I’mm sure you’ll agree that these impressive landscape photos were well worth the effort.  However, don’t forget that if you have any amazing, jaw-dropping, action packed or unusual photographs, send them into us and we’ll pay you for them if we are able to use them in the national newspapers and magazines.

We supply the press with hundreds of photos every week.  Whilst half of them come from our staff photographers who are out on the streets across the UK, the other half of our content is supplied by contributors just like you.

If you take a photo of anything that you think would be press-worthy, or just something you think others would enjoy, don’t hesitate, send it over to us today.

We will never use anything without your permission and you alway retain copyright.  We’ll make sure you get paid royalties if any of our national media clients want to use you images in their publications.

 

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